Crystal Clarity Copywriting

Go. Change the world. Leave the writing to me.

Crystal Clarity Copywriting

Go. Change the world. Leave the writing to me.

Reader question – Should you include your pricing on your sales page?

Are there good reasons for not putting your prices on your sales page or should you always include your pricing on your sales page?

Is it sneaky to leave them off, or is it good marketing?

Today’s sales-page-related reader question comes from Andrea Zimmerl of http://www.andreazimmerl.com/.  Andrea is the “Speaking Without Fear Coach”, who helps sensitive female entrepreneurs tame their online speaking fears so they get into the flow of showing up and sharing their message joyfully.

Andrea was curious about whether or not she should include prices on her sales pages. She asked, “I’ve seen sales pages without a price. You have to click the “Buy” button, which links to PayPal, and there you can see the price. Why do they do that? What’s the advantage?”

OK Andrea – I have pretty strong feelings about this issue, but I’ll try to be at least semi-objective before I share them.

Although I’m pretty solidly “No one right way” about most things in business, this is one of the few areas I’m happy to take a stand on. I’ll explain why later on in the post, but first, let try to answer your question about why some people don’t display their prices.

 

Why would you consider avoiding listing your pricing on your sales pages?

I can’t speak for everyone who’s ever published a sales page without a price. However, I do remember, back when I first started in online business in 2012, being repeatedly told to never put a price on my sales page.

It was apparently what passed for good business advice back then.

Here are a few of the reasons that the various coaches and marketing gurus of the time gave:

 

So… is there any merit in those arguments?

Honestly? In a sales page context, I’m dubious.

Granted, I suspect the first two reasons are based on solid advice… if you’re having a one-to-one sales conversation. In that context, it’s true that you don’t want to lead with price – for exactly the reasons the gurus gave.

But a sales page is NOT a one-to-one sales conversation… A conversation is sequential. In it, a “reader” can only hear what you’re telling them as you’re telling them it. On your sales page, however, they (hopefully) have all the information available to them on the spot.

That means THEY have the power to look where they want to look. If they want to know about the context for your price, they’ll look at the details of your offer. Or the testimonials. Or the FAQs. Regardless, they don’t have to wait for you to start speaking about it.

So what works in one context won’t necessarily work in the other.

As for the third reason? I’m really not sure what that’s about.  Personally, I suspect that somebody once told the coach in question that she was money-hungry because she was “too expensive”; and the accusation stung enough to stop her talking about price.

Let’s face it, it does indeed suck to be told that your prices are too high. But that doesn’t mean you’re wrong for charging that price, or that you should hide your prices from everyone else.

 

What 5 years online has taught me about pricing on sales pages

If you’d asked me three years ago whether to include your price in your sales page, I’d have said that opinions varied. I’d have added that personally, I like seeing them there, but that there were reasons to avoid them too.

Now, however, I’m a lot more convinced that prices SHOULD be on every sales page. And when I write sales pages for my clients I always ensure that prices are loud, proud and easy to spot.

In fact, if I can’t see a price on your page, I’ll almost always click away without reading, let alone buying. Here’s why

I know roughly what my budget is for any offer I’m considering buying. And if I have a $500 budget, and you charge $5,000 minimum, there’s no point in me reading through all your copy and getting my hopes up. A clear price tells me up front that I’m just not the right person for your offer, and I’m grateful for that.

It also makes me wonder whether you’re going to try to pressure (or trick) me into buying from you. And that really ruins any rapport your copy may have created.

A clear, unapologetic price, on the other hand, reassures me that you feel confident that what you’re charging will be worth it to me.

 

In other words: ALWAYS list your prices

For all those reasons, my recommendation to clients – and to Andrea in this post – is to always, always, ALWAYS include your price clearly on your sales page.

Even if you don’t have set-priced packages, you can still give potential clients a ballpark idea or a range of what they can expect to pay.

I know I usually answer questions like this with “It depends…”, and then talk about the factors involved to help you make the right decision for you.

This, however, is one of those rare occasions where I have an absolute, unwavering opinion on the subject: Put your prices on your sales page!

 

Do you have a sales page question you’d like me to answer?

I’m REALLY enjoying answering these questions for my readers. So if you have a question yourself, I’d love to answer it for you. And, as always, I’ll link to your business in the post, which will get you that teeny, tiny bit of extra exposure (every little bit counts, right?)

So whatever you want to know, pop your question in the field below, along with your contact details, and I’ll be happy to answer it for you in a future post.

2 responses to “Reader question – Should you include your pricing on your sales page?”

  1. Andrea
    Twitter:
    says:

    Thanks for answering my question Tanja. I’m on the same page. I always include a price on my sales pages. Simply because I dislike pages without a price. As you say, you know your budget and want to quickly check if that offer is for you or not. That values the time of the reader.

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