Client Profile: How Ava Grace, VIP attracted more great-fit clients and far fewer time-wasters

Ava Profile

IMPORTANT: read this section BEFORE you read Ava’s client profile

Ava warningOne thing I love about having my own business is getting to use my gifts in the service of causes I deeply believe in. If you know me in person, you know I see myself as pretty damn sex-positive. I’m quietly-but-openly bi and poly personally, and I’m fiercely in favour of marriage equality for others.

On top of that, I also believe passionately that sex work is (and should be seen as) a professional service like any other. I believe that in the right circumstances, a sex worker’s services can be healing. And finally, I believe that sex workers deserve the same respect, rights and industry protections as any other professional would. (Luckily, I live in a country where the law agrees!)

I want to acknowledge that some folks will find that confronting. Sex work may still be illegal in your part of the world. You may still believe that “no-one would ever truly choose to have sex for money”; or that it’s immoral; or that there’s no real difference between a grown adult who’s freely chosen a career as an escort, and a drug addict who’s been forced to turn tricks to support her habit.

If so, I don’t want to argue with you. I’d love it if reading this profile were to change your mind about sex work. But it’s OK if it doesn’t. It’s OK if you decide not to read this post at all, in fact. You have the right to your own beliefs and values around sex, and I’m fine with them being different to mine.

Just be aware that I’ll be heavily moderating comments on this one. It’s OK to disagree with something I’ve written. It’s not OK to be rude, disrespectful or otherwise nasty about it. So if I catch a hint of unpleasantness in any comments, they won’t end up published… just so you know.

And with that in mind… on with the client profile!

 

Introducing… Ava Grace, from Ava Grace, VIP (and some copy challenges y’all will probably recognise!)

Ava1My latest client, Ava Grace, describes her business role as a “Premier Brisbane Escort”. Like many solopreneurs, she works from home – in her Yeronga apartment. Unlike many other solopreneurs, the services she provides from that home are sexual ones.

Despite the apparent difference, however, many of the issues Ava faces around marketing and copywriting will be very familiar to Crystal Clarity readers. For example, when she first reached out to me, Ava was struggling with:

  • Getting clear on her business vision and communicating it: like me, Ava sees sex work as potentially healing on a deep level. But communicating that in a way that wouldn’t alienate her potential clients was a challenge for her. (Coaches in the audience: recognise that problem?)
  • Speaking to the benefits that resonated with her clients: many of Ava’s clients contacted her looking for one thing, but then experienced results that went much deeper. She was passionate about creating the deeper results, but focussing on them in her copy would turn off the people who needed them most. (Healers out there: know what that’s like?)
  • Copy that encouraged poor-fit clients to make contact: Ava knew who she enjoyed working with, but her old copy was bringing in far too many enquiries from time-wasters and people who just didn’t respect her as a professional. (Designers reading this: tell me you’re not nodding right now!)
  • Balancing her own authentic voice with presenting herself in the best light: One of Ava’s core values is authenticity, and she needed that to come through loud and clear… without putting off the people she most loved working with. (I think that’s one of those marketing challenges that’s near-universal.)

Plus, on top of all those common copy challenges, Ava had a problem that was unique to her industry. She wanted clients to be clear on what she offered, but Queensland law makes it illegal to detail the exact nature of a sex provider’s services. And even if she had been free to list each service, staying on-brand meant she had to do it without ever coming across as crass, crude or vulgar.

Rather than keep struggling with all those issues on her on, Ava got in touch with me.

Helping Ava create her new website involved asking a LOT of questions

When Ava first approached me, I was overjoyed to have the chance to take a practical stand for my beliefs about sex work. We already knew each other through a mutual heart-based business group, and both strongly suspected we’d work well together.

Ava’s only worry was that she wasn’t 100% sure that working with a copywriter was the way to go. At the time, she felt that:

“It can be hard enough clarifying my vision in the privacy of my own mind, let alone articulating it to someone else. And then getting that person to communicate it clearly to my clients? I was really worried that I just wouldn’t be able to guide you to create the copy I wanted, because I wasn’t sure what it was.”

It’s a valid concern. Copywriters aren’t mindreaders, so we rely on our clients to tell us what they want in terms of messaging and language. However, we also need to take responsibility for eliciting that information by asking as many questions as it takes until we truly *get* what our clients are looking for. Ava remembers:

Right from the beginning – during the Discovery Session – you asked me laser-focused questions that helped you understand what I was after generally. Then we worked together to clarify anything that was still murky, so we both held exactly the same vision for my work.

Finally, you asked a new set of questions and held a separate strategy session for every single page. All that before you even started writing a first draft – but the groundwork you put in definitely showed in the quality of the copy!

Then it involved working collaboratively to get the copy just right

Different copywriters have different processes when it comes to revisions. My standard packages all involve a first draft, and up to two rounds of edits.

Occasionally, I’ll nail a piece of copy on the first draft. Sometimes, though a client will realise that something they originally thought they wanted didn’t work – or we’ll discover that I’d misunderstood something they’d told me in the strategy session. Building in revisions means we can work collaboratively to get the copy just right together.

That process really worked for Ava, who reports:

The way you worked is exactly how I’d expect a service interaction to go. You let me know exactly what you needed from me, and then used the information I gave you to create just what I was after.

The copy you ended up writing was exactly what I would have said if I could write as well as you do. It felt so comfortable for me to read – it sounds just like me speaking. You listened to all my feedback, incorporated it, and together we created a website I’m incredibly proud of!

But the best thing about her new website is the results it brings her

When we spoke again, a few weeks after signing off her last page, Ava was excited about the results her new website was getting for her. Among the differences she was noticing were that:

The people visiting my site now have a much clearer idea of who I am and what I can do for them. That means more of the compatible clients – the ones I most love to work with – are making contact, so I’m getting more bookings from the people I want to hear from.

Meanwhile, the time-wasters now recognise that there’s no point in trying to connect, so I’m experiencing less stress and frustration from them. That gives me more time and energy to work with the clients I love – a total win-win situation!

Want to find out more about Ava’s work? Here’s how you can reach her…

I’m proud to be able to support Ava’s work in helping to create a healthier, more grounded approach to sex and sexuality in our culture. If you’d like to find out more about how she does that – or you’re just curious about what a sex worker’s copy looks like (ain’t nothing wrong with honest curiosity!) – you can find her at:

Again, please remember: Ava’s business is an adult one, so please be discerning about when/where you click through!

Getting ready to start work on your own website?

If there’s anything you’d like to know about Ava’s website project, feel free to ask – respectfully – in the comments below.

And if you have your own project coming up, I’d love to hear from you. I’m booked up through August, but have 2 slots available for client work starting in September. Want to make one of them yours?

Click here to book a FREE Discovery Session!

 

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